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1946美國記者所看到的Formosa!
王逸峰 2008/01/24
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013-washington-daily-news-1946-03-21-chinesische-ausbeutung-von-taiwan.jpg

這張照片是1946的三月由美國的Washington Daily News的頭版標題。
翻譯如下↓
內頁獨家報導:中國人剝削福爾摩沙比日本人更壞!

由於我無從取得這個報紙的全文報導,只能有限度地望文生義。但是我要介紹另一篇Time的文章,來佐證其所言不假。

記得以前聽過一個笑話,說如果時光可以倒流,台灣人寧可選擇盟軍把原子彈丟到台灣把國民黨政權丟到日本。本來我以為這只是笑話而已,但是六十二年前的Time雜誌(1946/6/10)確實出現這段文字:
………….The new Chinese Governor Chen Yi found the raid-battered Formosans docile. He promptly put his nephew in charge of the Taiwan Co., which bought coal at 200 yen a ton and sold it at 4,000. Black-market gold sold at 300,000 Chinese dollars an ounce, against $180,000 in Shanghai. Even in fertile Formosa, mass starvation threatened.
………..Last week "Down with the Governor!" posters appeared all over the island. In two towns, hungry natives burned sugar godowns. Formosans greeted the few visiting Americans with: "You were kind to the Japanese, you dropped the atom on them. You dropped the Chinese on us!"

↑這段文字精準地描述陳儀政府的貪腐,我試著重點翻譯如下↓
這位新長官陳儀發現飽受空襲之苦的台灣人很容易被馴服。他很快便安排他的姪子接管Taiwan Development Company. 這家公司可將一噸200日元的煤礦從台灣運到上海去賣4000日元,(按;一次淨賺20倍)。一盎司的黃金在黑市是30萬元(中國貨幣)但在上海則是18萬的美元。土地肥沃的台灣居然被大饑荒給威脅。 …..上周,全島貼滿了『長官下台』的海報,在兩個城鎮,饑餓的本地人燒毀了糖廠的倉庫。台灣人笑著跟來訪的美國人(按:應該是Time記者)說:『你們對日本人真仁慈,你把原子彈丟給他們,卻把中國人丟給我們!』

最令人驚訝的是,文末的結論:
Most foreign observers in Formosa agreed that if a referendum were taken today Formosans would vote for U.S. rule. Second choice—Japan.(翻譯:大部份在台灣的外國觀察者都同意一件事,假如讓台灣人公投,台灣人將選擇給美國統治,其次是日本。)

我想講的是,其實美國人對台灣的情蒐在戰後並沒有停止過。他們對中國占領軍的所作所為會完全不知情嗎?I don’t think so.

Time的這篇文章發在戰後的八個月,它的文章一開就寫eight months after V-J day(V-J Day就是 Victory over Japan Day),如果用這一天再往後八個多月,便發生了1947二二八。
有興趣者請讀原文↓或按連結

"This is the Shame!"
(http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,792979,00.html)
Monday, Jun. 10, 1946

At last, eight months after V-J day, sugar-starved China was getting supplies from its new sugarbowl, Formosa. Ships were plying the 400 miles from Kiirun to Shanghai with the first of 150,000 tons of Japanese stores confiscated by the Chinese Army that took over the island, under U.S. tutelage, last fall. But the resumption of trade with tropically lush, industrially rich Formosa was a sweet-&-sour business.

Formosans complained that the Chinese occupation army was looting stocks, letting crops, refineries, railroads and power plants go to rack & ruin. Just as angry Shanghailanders, who could buy only from the government-backed Formosa Sugar Co., feared that a colossal sugar corner was being rigged in the already disastrous black market.

Of the Moon & Sun. The Japanese, who seized Formosa after their first war on China 50 years ago, ruthlessly exploited its land and people. Formosa made Japan the world's fourth sugar-producer; it yielded enough rice to feed all the Mikado's armies as well as coal and tin, gold, silver and copper; teak and camphor (70% of U.S. mothballs) and aromatic Oolong tea. At mountain-ringed Jitsu-Getsu-Tan—Lake of the Moon and Sun—the Japanese built the nucleus of a power system that put Formosa industrially ahead of the Philippines.

The Taiwan (after the island's Asiatic name) Development Co. rigidly controlled industry and trade, brought half a million Japanese to live among six million Formosans (chiefly Chinese who have pushed the Malayan headhunters into the mountains).

World War II brought B-29 raids to Formosa, and liberation brought the scarcely more welcome visitation of Chinese bureaucracy. (Formosans use the adjective "Chinese" as a synonym for inefficiency and confusion.)

The new Chinese Governor Chen Yi found the raid-battered Formosans docile. He promptly put his nephew in charge of the Taiwan Co., which bought coal at 200 yen a ton and sold it at 4,000. Black-market gold sold at 300,000 Chinese dollars an ounce, against $180,000 in Shanghai. Even in fertile Formosa, mass starvation threatened.

Japan Got the Atom. Chen Yi rounded up scores of "collaborators" while his pooh-bahs made themselves snug. Last week "Down with the Governor!" posters appeared all over the island. In two towns, hungry natives burned sugar godowns. Formosans greeted the few visiting Americans with: "You were kind to the Japanese, you dropped the atom on them. You dropped the Chinese on us!"

Thoughtful Chinese on the mainland began to agree with the Formosans. Said Ta Rung Pao, China's counterpart of the New York Times: "Fundamentally speaking, China was not qualified to take over . . . she lacks the men . . . technique . . . commodities . . . capital. She governs, but is inefficient. She takes, but she does not give. This is the government's shame."

Most foreign observers in Formosa agreed that if a referendum were taken today Formosans would vote for U.S. rule. Second choice—Japan.

1946美國記者所看到的Formosa!

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